CONTACT |

Home / Video / Reviews and Help / Help and Advice / Top 5 Beginner Mistakes

Top 5 Beginner Mistakes

New videos each month...

Join our newsletter and I'll tell you the instant there's a new one.

Description

Have you ever bought a shiny new camera then been disappointed because the photos are no different to with the old one?

Photography is full of contradictions. Apertures for example, control amount of depth of field or background blur - but to what extent varies according to the length of the lens and the distance to subject. And sometimes you can use any aperture you like and it won’t make any difference at all because you’re outside the infinity focus.

So if you were to learn that an aperture of f5.6 (or less) will make the background blurry, that’s correct - but only in certain circumstances. See what I mean…?

I’ve been training photographers since 2008 and  there are some common mistakes they (we) all make. Now, mistakes are wonderful things because they always carry a gift for us if we bother to look for it. However some are caused by confusion, often spread over the massive amount of free information available to us online. That and the big bucks marketing campaigns put out by manufacturers all vying for our business.

My Top 5 Photography Mistakes are…

  • The camera’s light meter is always right: No it isn’t, it’s a starting point but it’s not always what you want. The camera doesn’t know how bright or dark you want it to be. It doesn’t know which area of the image is the most important to you as it’s creator. Sometimes it’s perfect but not always. It’s up to you to check the exposure the camera suggests then change it if needs be to be what you want.

  • Spot Metering Is Best: No, it’s more precise when you know which area of an image you want the camera to interpret as mid grey. If the most important part of an image to you is a bright area and you spot meter from it, the camera will darken it and make it mid grey. If you spot meter from a dark area it’ll brighten it to mid grey. You have to ask yourself if that’s how you want the image to be. Personally I never use it because it’s another thing to think about. I find evaluative is generally more consistent and gets me closer to where I want it, but I may still have to tweak it to be exactly what I want.

  • Settings are Important: In the vast majority of cases the shutter, aperture and ISO settings don’t make any difference to the image. An exposure of 125th sec @F11 100 ISO is the same thing as 250th sec @F11 200 ISO and 125th sec @ F16 200 ISO. Shutters control movement and Apertures depth of field - but only if you’re focussing inside the infinity point of the lens.

  • Longer focal lengths are to make far off things come closer: Yes they do, but there’s much more creative elements to it. As you change the distance between you and the subject, it changes the way elements of the image appear to stack up behind each other.  Short lengths make elements in the background of a photo appear spread further apart and capture a wide field of view. Long lengths make backgrounds appear compressed together and have a narrow field of view so you can exclude unwanted elements for the sides of a composition. Changing focal length forces you to change the distance between you and the subject because you have to compensate for the magnification differences.

  • A Better Camera Shoots Better Photos: No No No No No! All a camera does is record light as a digital file and nothing more no matter how many features and functions it has. It doesn’t matter if it’s a £35,000 Hasselbald or an entry level compact zoom. The more expensive cameras just give us higher quality or larger image files and possibly a higher ability to capture details in shadows and highlights at the same time (known as dynamic range) - nothing more. Subject matter, composition, lighting, decisive moment, emotion, mood etc are nothing to do with the camera and everything to do with the photographer.

If you want to avoid confusing mistakes like these, having someone guide you through them is probably the best investment you can make for your photography. It’s also a common beginner mistake to think there’s all you need available for free. Sure there’s some great free stuff available, but how will you know what order to put it together and all the contradictions if you don’t have an experienced guide to put you on the right path?

Us humans naturally take the path of least resistance, but sometimes what appears to be the cheap and easy way - isn’t. It just leads to more confusion, frustration and possibly a lack of confidence.

If you’re a beginner don’t make the same mistakes I see over and over again. I’m a professional guide with may years experience and a passion for teaching and sharing it. Check out my Ultimate Beginners Course. It costs less than a used lens and has 100% refund guarantee.

John Spear said.

“Now I know where I was going wrong and how to put it right. My friends in the local camera club are amazed at my improvement. I cannot put a value on the pride and pleasure I got from this course.”

More reviews…

https://www.photographycourses.biz/testimonials

Related Videos

Latest Videos

commasopencommascloseI remember the first time I opened Lightroom: Wow, where do I start?... Watching  7 Steps to Workflow Mastery makes it looks so easy to master!!

- Stephane Battesti  -
read more...

Help us Grow

Logon

 Create New Account 
 Forgotten Password? 

Comments

Top 5 Beginner Mistakes
I love your videos. I have learned so much from them. I was having trouble getting sharp pictures. Everything I did seemed always to be a little on the soft side. At first I thought it was my eyesight but, no that
wasn't the problem. So naturally I blamed the camera. But your video about camera shake taught me how to avoid camera shake and now my photos are a whole lot better. This last video about the mistakes
that many beginners make I must admit that I am guilty of doing some of them. Now I can look through my camera lens with a different point of view. Thank you so much. I look forward to your next video.
shutterbug64 31, Mar 2018 @ 01:29
I love your videos. I have learned so much from them. I was having trouble getting sharp pictures. Everything I did seemed always to be a little on the soft side. At first I thought it was my eyesight but, no that
wasn't the problem. So naturally I blamed the camera. But your video about camera shake taught me how to avoid camera shake and now my photos are a whole lot better. This last video about the mistakes
that many beginners make I must admit that I am guilty of doing some of them. Now I can look through my camera lens with a different point of view. Thank you so much. I look forward to your next video.
0
Top 5 Beginner Mistakes
Hi Mike I think your video is always very nice I've just watched your new video top 5 beginner mistakes I've learned a lot about my years I'm very curious about your opinion about animal photography, especially dogs and cats, because it's very difficult tell them what to do.
Can you say what are the beginners' mistakes here?
Yours sincerely, Frank Prinsen in the Netherlands
faprinsen 31, Mar 2018 @ 12:28
Hi Mike I think your video is always very nice I've just watched your new video top 5 beginner mistakes I've learned a lot about my years I'm very curious about your opinion about animal photography, especially dogs and cats, because it's very difficult tell them what to do.
Can you say what are the beginners' mistakes here?
Yours sincerely, Frank Prinsen in the Netherlands
0
Top 5 Beginner Mistakes
Mike, I have watched so many videos, read so many books, but when I go out to shoot photos everything gets jumbled in my brain. Most of the time I do remember aperture, I SO, and composition rules but my photos - to me anyway - are not very good...uninspired. Perhaps the problem is that I have a very limited area in which to photograph. I am not in an exotic place with exotic people. How long had you been shooting photographs before getting photos you liked became intuitive? Thanks, Stephanie
s 31, Mar 2018 @ 18:36
Mike, I have watched so many videos, read so many books, but when I go out to shoot photos everything gets jumbled in my brain. Most of the time I do remember aperture, I SO, and composition rules but my photos - to me anyway - are not very good...uninspired. Perhaps the problem is that I have a very limited area in which to photograph. I am not in an exotic place with exotic people. How long had you been shooting photographs before getting photos you liked became intuitive? Thanks, Stephanie
0
Top 5 Beginner Mistakes
Hi Mike,
I have trouble with light.
I had taken photos of a party a few days ago. I bounced the light off the ceiling and I think I did ok.
Now when I'm enhancing the photos in lightroom I'm trying to expose the people's faces a bit but I can't keep the atmosphere of a dark background party with coloured lights.
They now look like I took them in daylight with people just dancing with no party feel to them. Please help me.
Thank you and regards
Alan Gallagher
alandrez68 3, Apr 2018 @ 15:35
Hi Mike,
I have trouble with light.
I had taken photos of a party a few days ago. I bounced the light off the ceiling and I think I did ok.
Now when I'm enhancing the photos in lightroom I'm trying to expose the people's faces a bit but I can't keep the atmosphere of a dark background party with coloured lights.
They now look like I took them in daylight with people just dancing with no party feel to them. Please help me.
Thank you and regards
Alan Gallagher
0
Top 5 Beginner Mistakes
Hey Mike, great video and a good reminder to people like myself who dips in and out of photography. What I learned from 7 Blocks is whenever I am out and about I have my camera always set to Aperture mode and dial in the appropriate ISO that way I am ready to choose how creative I want to be, then I work on my composition whilst keeping an eye on the Histogram. Rarely I go in to Shutter mode as I am more of landscape shooter. Practice is key to mastering and finding those amazing shots.
ajaja2018 3, Apr 2018 @ 16:14
Hey Mike, great video and a good reminder to people like myself who dips in and out of photography. What I learned from 7 Blocks is whenever I am out and about I have my camera always set to Aperture mode and dial in the appropriate ISO that way I am ready to choose how creative I want to be, then I work on my composition whilst keeping an eye on the Histogram. Rarely I go in to Shutter mode as I am more of landscape shooter. Practice is key to mastering and finding those amazing shots.
0

Logon

 Create New Account 
 Forgotten Password?