CONTACT |

Home / Video / Technical / Getting Sharp Images / Diopter Adjustment

Diopter Adjustment

UBC 2017

Description

We've had a lot of emails asking about diopter adjustment - that's how to set up your viewfinder for your eyesight. If you wear glasses I strongly recommend you do this because I know from experience how difficult it is to see the whole image and all it's data when you look through the viewfinder wearing glasses.

Auto focus is very accurate and provided you've got it set up properly you can trust it to get it right. So when the camera beeps to say it's focused and what you see is fuzzy - it's very worrying. By sorting out your diopter adjustment this will never be a problem again.

Diopter adjustment is pretty quick and easy to do. You'll need your camera, lens (I find a focal length of about 70 -100mm is best). It's really important you don't change the distance between your camera and the point of focus when setting your diopter so always use a tripod.

Whether you're long or short sighted, once you've got the diopter set up you won't need to wear your glasses when you look through the viewfinder regardless of how far away  the thing you're photographing is. If you're both long and short you'll still need glasses with you so you can see the camera settings for reading the LCD on the back.

Related Videos

Latest Videos

commasopencommascloseUltimate Beginners Course was a great start in the photographic world. Money well spent.
- Rodney Dixon -

Help us Grow

Logon

 Create New Account 
 Forgotten Password? 

Comments

Diopter Adjustment
So many people try to use the viewfinder while wearing glasses, not knowing that the viewfinder actually replaces your glasses to correct vision. Great useful video advice! ;-)
grabsuccess 20, Sep 2016 @ 11:09
So many people try to use the viewfinder while wearing glasses, not knowing that the viewfinder actually replaces your glasses to correct vision. Great useful video advice! ;-)
0
Diopter Adjustment
This may be the way to go if you are simply long or short sighted. But it doesn't work if you have astigmatism. The simple optics in the diopter cannot correct for astigmatism. For those of us with astigmatism, or others who simply cannot function without their glasses (contact wearers for example), the best way is to simply neutralize the diopter. You do this by looking through the viewfinder with your glasses on and adjusting the diopter until the lines and numbers in the viewfinder are as sharp as possible. Look at the markings in the viewfinder and NOT the scene in front of you. This can then be fine tuned by autofocusing on a distant object and turning the diopter adjustment very slightly to see if there is any improvement.
mcveed 28, May 2019 @ 18:46
This may be the way to go if you are simply long or short sighted. But it doesn't work if you have astigmatism. The simple optics in the diopter cannot correct for astigmatism. For those of us with astigmatism, or others who simply cannot function without their glasses (contact wearers for example), the best way is to simply neutralize the diopter. You do this by looking through the viewfinder with your glasses on and adjusting the diopter until the lines and numbers in the viewfinder are as sharp as possible. Look at the markings in the viewfinder and NOT the scene in front of you. This can then be fine tuned by autofocusing on a distant object and turning the diopter adjustment very slightly to see if there is any improvement.
0

Logon

 Create New Account 
 Forgotten Password?